Gibson Les Paul 1958

John Shults

Posted on July 26 2021

Gibson Les Paul Guitars 1958

 

The Gibson Les Paul guitar line in 1958 is my favorite year of Gibson guitars to collect. Gibson Les Paul guitars from 1958 are some of the most expensive vintage guitars to collect because they're also some of the best Gibson ever made. There were five different Gibson Les Paul models available in 1958, but they all went through significant updates that year. I am a collector of Gibson Les Paul guitars from 1958 so you can contact me here to sell a Gibson guitar.

How to date Gibson Les Paul 1958 guitars?

If you're Gibson Les Paul guitar is from 1958 then I'm probably interested in buying it. If your Gibson Les Paul is from 1978, then it's probably not for me. It's important to date a Gibson Les Paul accurately to understand its true value and pricing. I use the serial number, features and potentiometer codes to date Gibson Les Paul guitars. You can get help with Gibson guitar dating here: How to date a Gibson Les Paul

The Gibson Les Paul Standard pictured above is from my favorite year of the model: 1958. We can easily date this Gibson Les Paul to 1958 because of the serial number prefix, the features, and the potentiometer codes. The serial number is ink stamped (not impressed) and begins with an "8" prefix. The important Gibson Les Paul features are a single cutaway carved Maple top on Mahogany body, Cherry Sunburst finished flame Maple top with center seam, amber bonnet style control knobs and two full size humbucking pickups with PATENT APPLIED FOR stickers. The potentiometer codes indicate they were made during the 4th week of 1958. 

Gibson Les Paul Junior 1958

Gibson Les Paul Junior 1958 guitar

While it may have been the bottom of the line then, the Gibson Les Paul Junior 1958 is certainly not the bottom of the line any more! The Les Paul Junior started 1958 as a single cutaway slab Mahogany Sunburst finished body with single P-90 pickup, but transitioned to a double cutaway Cherry body in mid 1958. It was Gibson's entry level solid body electric guitar in the 1950s so it was also the most affordable solid body guitar.

I've seen the value of Gibson Les Paul Junior 1958s rise steadily over the past few years. To me, they're worth far more than the price they usually sell for. Gibson Les Paul Juniors in the 1950s are fantastic playing vintage guitars that I personally love. You can contact me here to sell a Gibson Les Paul Junior.

Gibson Les Paul TV 1958

Gibson Les Paul TV 1958

While often mistaken for a Les Paul TV Junior, the Gibson Les Paul TV 1958 is not a Junior at all, but it shares almost all of the same features. The Gibson Les Paul TV also started 1958 as a single cutaway Limed Mahogany yellow finished slab Mahogany body with single P-90 pickup, but transitioned to a double cutaway body style mid 1958. 

Gibson Les Paul Special 1958

Gibson Les Paul Special 1958 yellow two pickups

The Gibson Les Paul Special 1958 is very similar to the Les Paul TV, but has the added usability of a neck position pickup and additional volume and tone knobs. It shared the tv yellow finish that the Gibson catalog called Limed Mahogany. Like the previous two examples of the Gibson Les Paul 1958, the Special also transitioned from a single cutaway to a double cutaway mid year. 

The Gibson Les Paul Special 1958 is a valuable instrument because of its rich harmonic complexity and sustain from the wrap tail bridge, but also because of its simplicity. I collect Gibson Les Paul Special guitars so contact me here if you want to sell a Gibson Les Paul. 

Gibson Les Paul Standard 1958

Gibson Les Paul Standard Burst 1958

Perhaps my favorite Gibson Les Paul 1958 is the Standard, often called the Burst! The Gibson Les Paul Standard 1958 began the year as a gold finished Les Paul with humbucking pickups, but transitioned to a Cherry Sunburst finish early that year that helped reveal the beauty of the often figured Maple cap. The value of a Gibson Les Paul Standard 1958 in both the Gold finish and Sunburst usually exceeds $100,000 in pretty much any condition. Do I have your attention? The guitar I'm most ready to buy and collect is a Gibson Les Paul Standard 1958, 1958, or 1960. You can contact me here to sell a Gibson Les Paul.

 It's easy to date a Gibson Les Paul Standard 1958 if you have the right information. The serial number should be ink stamped on the back of the headstock with an "8" prefix. The potentiometer codes should date to 1957 or 1958. It should be a single cutaway Les Paul shape with Maple cap and Mahogany body. The finish can be either the gold of Cherry Sunburst variety, but it must have full size humbucking pickups. You can get more information on Gibson guitar dating and serial numbers here: How to date a Gibson Les Paul

Gibson Les Paul Custom 1958

At the top of the Gibson Les Paul 1958 line was the Custom! The Gibson Les Paul Custom 1958 featured an all Mahogany body with no Maple cap, jet black finish throughout, usually three full size humbucking pickups, and gold hardware. It was more expensive that the Gibson Les Paul Standard in 1958, but guitar collectors like myself have determined that they're not quite as enjoyable as the Gibson Les Paul Standard 1958, so they're a bit less valuable than the Standard. They're still fantastic guitars that I love to play. I'm looking to collect and buy a Gibson Les Paul Custom 1958 so you can contact me here to sell a Gibson Les Paul

One of the problems with the Gibson Les Paul Custom 1958 is that Gibson used three humbucking pickups instead of two. The middle pickup can sometime leave nowhere to swing the pick to play the guitar. The other interesting part of the third pickup on a Gibson Les Paul Custom 1958 is that the middle pickup is out of phase from the bridge pickup. There's still only a three position switch, so the middle position is out of phase and parallel, but you can't use the volume knobs to dial in the amount of phase cancellation like you can on a two pickup Gibson Les Paul that's also out of phase. 

 The Gibson Les Paul Custom 1958 is still a fantastic instrument that I'd love to collect. They're easy to date using the serial number, features, and potentiometer codes. The serial number should be ink stamped on the back of the headstock with an 8 prefix. The potentiometer codes should indicate that they were made in 1957 or 1958. You can get more help with Gibson Les Paul dating here: How to date a Gibson Les Paul

 

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