1964 Epiphone FT-79 Texan

1964 Epiphone FT-79 Texan

Some of my favorite vintage Gibson guitars to ever come through the shop actually bear the name "Epiphone." The Epiphone company sold to Gibson in 1957 after almost a decade of management ineffectiveness and a failure to keep up with changing market forces (no solid body guitar?). Gibson's purchase of the Epiphone brand name came with a stockpile of half finished guitars and unused parts. In 1958, the Epiphone Texan was born out of this pile when Gibson mated a round shoulder jumbo body to a long scale Epiphone neck. This 1964 Epiphone…Read more
Gibson Era Vintage Epiphone Guitars

Gibson Era Vintage Epiphone Guitars

The two decades from 1950 to 1970 saw a massive shift for the Epiphone brand name from family company to Gibson's upscale line to cheap import sub-brand. Many players are unfamiliar with the fact that the Gibson made, Epiphone branded guitars from 1957 until 1969 were partially an attempt by Gibson to get their guitars into a larger audience of shops in the US and abroad. These guitars were made on the exact same line by the same employees as their Gibson brand counterparts and were usually more expensive. The flat top line in the 1960s…Read more
Vintage Epiphone Wilshire Electric Guitar

Vintage Epiphone Wilshire Electric Guitar

The Epiphone Wilshire was introduced in 1959 as  medium grade professional electric guitar. The Wilshire was a double cutaway, thin solid body electric guitar that initially featured Epiphone's New York made pickups, then Gibson made P-90s in 1961, then mini-humbucker pickups in 1962 until its retirement in 1969. The thin, solid Mahogany body was reminiscent of the Les Paul Special/SG Special but the styling, tail piece and pickups set the Wilshire apart from being just an Epiphone version of that guitar.     Do you have a vintage Epiphone Wilshire for sale? I'm looking to…Read more
Vintage Guitar Appraiser

Vintage Guitar Appraiser

Are you wondering what your vintage acoustic guitar, vintage electric guitar, or vintage amplifier might be worth? If your cherished heirloom was stolen or damaged, how would you prove to the insurance company what it might be worth? I'd like to help put your mind at ease. My affordable appraisal service can provide you and your insurer with a properly researched document that will determine the make, model, year of manufacture, originality and condition estimate. Furthermore, this document will provide valuable insight into the value of your guitar in the open market. My…Read more
Vintage Gibson Nut Width and Neck Profiles

Vintage Gibson Nut Width and Neck Profiles

Both players and collectors alike consider a guitar's nut width and neck profile to be very important. Gibson changed the standard nut width many times from the 1930s to the 1960s. The information below is a generalized break down of what you can expect from a standard Gibson guitar from each time period. 1930s: Usually 1 3/4" (44.5 mm) wide nut. Many V neck profiles although round is common as well. Hawaiian style guitars: 1 7/8" 1940s: Usually 1 3/4" until 1947. Wartime necks with no truss rod are often 1 7/8" and very full.…Read more
Consign your vintage guitar or amplifier with True Vintage Guitar

Consign your vintage guitar or amplifier with True Vintage Guitar

True Vintage Guitar offers consignment service for those who want to sell their guitar or amplifier at a professional level without the years of infrastructure building and hassle that it requires. A consignment option puts years of experience in your hands and safe guards you from the pitfalls of selling outside your area of expertise. These are some of the benefits you'll receive when you consign your piece with True Vintage Guitar: Professional pricing that combines real industry knowledge with current published values Diversified inventory that draws in buyers and allows them to shop…Read more
Vintage Gibson Made Epiphone Flat-top Guitars

Vintage Gibson Made Epiphone Flat-top Guitars

The Epiphone company had been making flat top guitars since the early 1930s but they never really seem to catch on like the Gibson and Martin made flat tops. The success of their archtop guitars wasn't enough to overcome their management problems that arose in the mid 1950s. The Epiphone company was sold to Gibson in 1957 and Gibson saw it as an opportunity to revamp the line and sell guitars to a new audience of dealers. The leftover stock of half finished parts arrived in Kalamazoo after the sale and Gibson was not keen…Read more
1954 Epiphone FT-210 Deluxe Cutaway

1954 Epiphone FT-210 Deluxe Cutaway

While Epiphone's archtop guitar line would give Gibson a run for their money, the flat-top line was lacking in a guitar at the top of the food chain. Gibson's big fancy J-200 model was the target to beat. The good folks at Epiphone decided their new model would be called the FT-210 (10 more than the J-200!) Deluxe Cutaway. The lower bout was a monsterous 17 3/8" wide and the back and sides were curly Maple. The head stock and fretboard inlays could be spotted from a mile away. The cutaway added access…Read more
1963 Epiphone Coronet Silver Fox

1963 Epiphone Coronet Silver Fox

It's hard to beat a hot Gibson P-90, a wrap tail and a slab of Mahogany.  1963 was the first year of the batwing headstock and the custom color they called Silver Fox.  The early 60s saw many funky new designs including the Fender Jaguar, Gibson SG and endless Chicago made cheapies branded Kay, Harmony and Silvertone.  This guitar is light, super resonant and the P-90 just screamed.  The neck was actually 1 9/16" wide which was odd for Gibson pre-1965.  This bare bones rock machine paired with a tweed Fender Deluxe was…Read more
The first appearance of the Epiphone Texan – c.1958

The first appearance of the Epiphone Texan – c.1958

These guitars baffled me for some time with their odd features.  I tried to get my hands on one but I just couldn't find an early example.  This 1958 Texan ended up coming to me.What makes these so specialis the fact that they are an enduring example of Epiphone and Gibson history.  The body and the neck on the early Texans were made in 2 different factories.  When Epiphone sold to Gibson they shipped all the leftover parts to Philadelphia to Kalamazoo.  Gibson began building guitars out of them using everything they could.…Read more
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