1964 Fender Stratocaster!

1964 Fender Stratocaster!

This vintage Stratocaster stands out as one of my favorite guitars to ever grace the pages of Truevintageguitar.com: An original 1964 Fender Stratocaster, one family owned since '64. The Stratocaster model debuted from Fender in 1954 with many player inspired design breakthroughs like the Comfort Contour body, Synchronized Tremolo tailpiece, three single coil pickups, etc. Leo Fender's team likely had no idea what kind of effect it would have on the entire world of music and style. The Stratocaster model started life with a neck made of Maple bolted to a body made…Read more
1952 Fender Telecaster – Barn Find

1952 Fender Telecaster – Barn Find

This content copyright Truevintageguitar.com!   Leo Fender's Broadcaster, later renamed the Telecaster, wasn't the first solid body/Spanish style electric guitar. It was the first commercially successful solid body electric Spanish guitar. Its design was so perfect that it's been in continuous production in basically the same style since its introduction in 1950. This example from the 1952 production year has been ridden hard - for decades! The entire guitar has been refinished probably a few times. Still, it retains a lot of its original parts. The new owner has it up and running…Read more
Fender Jazzmasters! 1960, 1962, 1966, 1971

Fender Jazzmasters! 1960, 1962, 1966, 1971

This clean but lightly faded 1960 Fender Jazzmaster guitar came in and went out of the shop a few years back. I was thrilled to have it! It's one of the ones that "got away" I suppose. I remember it being a superbly comfortable weight, having a delightful playing neck and fretboard, as well as having warm but articulate Jazzmaster pickups. The lightly faded faux tortoiseshell pickguard really complimented the faded sunburst.   I'm always looking for Jazzmaster guitars from the late 1950s up until production tailed off in the late 1970s. I…Read more
1946 Fender Model 26 Deluxe!

1946 Fender Model 26 Deluxe!

The Fender Electric Instrument Co was established in 1946 immediately after Doc Kaufman left the K&F brand. The first run of amplifiers for this new company consisted of three models: the Princeton, the Model 26 "Deluxe", and the Professional. Their lacquered wood cabinets and combination metal strip and cloth grills made them easy targets for the collector nick name of "Woodies".   This Model 26 Deluxe amplifier bears the speaker manufacturing date of the 22nd week of 1946 and serial number 395. Somehow it made it through life without losing its original canvas…Read more
Fender’s Princeton Reverb-Amp!

Fender’s Princeton Reverb-Amp!

1964 was a transitional year for the entire Fender amplifier line. All amplifiers were now covered in a new black material that was striking in appearance and extremely sturdy: black Tolex! Much of the line was already utilizing brown or white Tolex material but the Champ was still dressed in the cool looking but very fragile tweed covering. Not only that, but effects were starting to become standards in guitar tone. Fender's Reverb unit was a hot seller but required hauling around and servicing an additional piece of gear. Fender's research and development…Read more
“Should I buy a tweed Fender Champ if I already have a blackface Champ?”

“Should I buy a tweed Fender Champ if I already have a blackface Champ?”

I recently received this question from a friend: "Hey John, As my most trusted source on music equipment, can you help me understand if I should purchase a tweed fender champ?  I already have a 1965 blackface champ.  Am I incorrect in thinking the tones will be worlds apart? --Friend" I'm flattered! I've narrowed my focus for vintage amps largely on clean examples from Fender recently because of the intersection of their prevalence here in the US and desirability. Champs are some of the most fun because they are simple, affordable, and can…Read more
The Fender Telecaster: 1969

The Fender Telecaster: 1969

By 1969, the Telecaster model had been relegated to fifth place on the price list for standard solid body electric guitars. The top of the line Jaguar was offered at $429.50 but a standard Telecaster with Rosewood fretboard could be purchased for almost half that at $269.50. It's possible that the Jaguar and Jazzmaster's high prices helped kill their popularity in the 1970s while the Telecaster shined as one of Fender's flagship designs and helped keep the company afloat. As the Telecaster's popularity surged in the late 1960s, Fender started developing unique variations…Read more
Fender’s Thinline Telecaster

Fender’s Thinline Telecaster

The recently purchased Fender company was noticing some complaints about one of their most popular models in 1967: the Telecaster was gaining weight. High quality (read: light weight) Ash to make guitar bodies was becoming scarce while the heavier stuff was readily available. Legendary German guitar designer Roger Rossmeisel was then employed at Fender and set out to design a guitar that could utilize the more abundant (heavy) Ash and yet not break the player's back. Rossmeisel's first design was to route away body material underneath the pickguard. The modification was completely hidden…Read more
1966 Fender Jaguar – Lake Placid Blue!

1966 Fender Jaguar – Lake Placid Blue!

This was a really special guitar that came through the shop last year: an early 1966 Fender Jaguar in custom color Lake Placid Blue. Although it was missing the original case, it was in spectacular condition with all original finish and parts. It showed no evidence of prior repair and required only light cleaning and set up. Fender's Jaguar model debuted in 1962 at the top of the electric guitar line, only four years after the Jazzmaster's introduction. It featured an offset body shape slightly modified from the Jazzmaster, 24" scale neck, two…Read more
The Fender Custom… or Maverick

The Fender Custom… or Maverick

  The post-CBS buyout Fender Musical Instrument Company was presented with a problem unfamiliar to it in prior years: leftover stock and parts from a model that was a commercial failure. Fender's Electric XII model failed to sell as many pieces as anticipated and the leftover unfinished bodies and necks were piling up at the factory. In 1969, Fender's production manager was tasked with repurposing the stock into something they could sell. Thus, the Custom was born. Long time Fender employee "Babe" Simoni skirted the R&D department and set out to solve the…Read more